Joe McPhee & Graham Lambkin / Dawn Kasper / Mario de Vega

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Joe McPhee & Graham Lambkin

In 1993 one of the chief concerns of Lambkin’s then fledgling Shadow Ring was to emulate, on a cheap Casio keyboard, the electronic textures of ’70s McPhee collaborator John Snyder’s ARP synthesizer. Twenty-two years later Lambkin and McPhee recorded their Chance Meeting album using chimes, whistle, pocket synthesizer, tape, Baoding balls and other objects. They have publicly performed just twice as a duo and now happily share the same branch of Stop & Shop in Poughkeepsie, NY.

Graham Lambkin is a multidisciplinary artist who first came to prominence in the early 90s through the formation of his experimental music group The Shadow Ring. A sound organizer rather than music maker, Lambkin looks at an everyday object and sees an ocean of possibility, continually transforming quotidian atmospheres and the mundane into expressive sound art using tape manipulation techniques, chance operations and the thick ambience of domestic field recordings. Joe McPhee has been a deeply emotional composer, improviser, and multi-instrumentalist since his emergence on the creative jazz and new music scenes in the late 60s. Inspired by the music of Albert Ayler, he taught himself the saxophone and proceeded to cut two records that remain defining monuments to the civil rights era: the out free jazz of Underground Railroad and avant-funk of Nation Time. His odyssey since has taken McPhee through Deep Listening collaborations with Pauline Oliveros and countless left field improv sessions both within and way outside of the jazz tradition.

Dawn Kasper

Dawn Kasper is a New York based interdisciplinary artist working in performance, installation, sculpture, drawing, photography, video, and sound. Her work emerges out of a fascination with existentialism, subjects of vulnerability, desire, and the construction of meaning. Kasper often critiques the corporatized aspects of culture by examining the emotions most commonly manipulated by advertisers and media such as fear, panic, hate, envy, lust, and anxiety. Creating scenes that double as a platform for living sculpture, she performs in a structured yet spontaneous manner using props, costume, comedy, gesture, extreme physicality, repetition, and monologue.

Mario de Vega

Mario de Vega is a Mexico City-born experimental sound artist. His works include site-specific interventions and experiments in psychoacoustics that frequently push the limits of audio perception. He uses challenging frequencies said to induce visceral reactions in the audience, and sound as a tool to confront contemporary issues around and personal experiences of vulnerability.

Presented in partnership with Festival Aural, Mexico City