When Sun Comes Out


WHEN
SUN
COMES
OUT

Blank Forms is pleased to present When Sun Comes Out, our first benefit exhibition including works by over 40 artists, nearly all of whom are collaborators or friends of the organization. Taking its title from Sun Ra’s 1963 album, for which a rare silkscreened cover designed by Claude Dangerfield is among the works on offer, the exhibition refers back to Blank Forms’ first gala in 2017 honoring Marshall Allen and the Sun Ra Arkestra, and also looks to the future with hope for sunnier days of music, celebration, and performance.


2020 has been a catastrophic year for the arts, and the performing arts in particular, so we thank you for considering this crucial fundraising initiative. All sales will be split with the artists and the proceeds that go to Blank Forms will help fund future performances, publications, and archival initiatives.


BENEFIT COMMITTEE: Miguel Abreu, Roland Augustine, Mark Beasley, Barbara Bloom, Gavin Brown, Ashley Carr, James Cohan Gallery, John Corbett, Lauren Cornell, Jim Dempsey, Bridget Donahue, Peter Freeman, Maxwell Graham, Carol Greene, Jane Hait, Andria Hickey, Hannah Hoffman, Jennie C. Jones, Sanya Kantarovsky, Ruba Katrib, Arto Lindsay, Lawrence Luhring, Anthony McCall, Suzanne Modica, Louise Neri, Zeena Parkins and Jeff Preiss, Jamar Roberts, Gordon Robichaux, Felicity Scott, Bennett Simpson, Olivia Smith, Gordon VeneKlasen, Ethan Wagner, Thea Westreich, Bree Zucker.

Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili
Quarantine Flowers, 2020
Polaroid
4 1/4 × 3 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris and LC Queisser, Tbilisi
Kai Althoff
Untitled, 2018
Oil in linen
26 × 23 in
36 1/4 × 32 3/4 in framed
Courtesy of the artist and TRAMPS
Leilah Babirye
The Kuchu Series (Queer Ugandans), 2019
Acrylic on paper
12 × 9 in
Courtesy of Gordon Robichaux, New York and Stephen Friedman, London
Fia Backström
Touching Sensibles I, 2015
Photogravure with woodcut
22 × 29 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Trisha Baga
General Fatigue, 2018
Acrylic on lenticular print
27 1/8 × 19 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Olga Balema
Biomorphic Attachment (looking at a tree), 2014
Foam, latex, steel
76 3/4 × 23 5/8 × 15 3/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and High Art Gallery, Paris
Davide Balula
Clock (Swamped Up Sagg), 2020
Wood, weed, modified clock
23 in diameter, 14 in deep
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris
Peter Brötzmann
Untitlted (landscape), 2012
Painted wooden box construction with shaped metal, painted foam, and copper wire
6 1/4 × 8 × 3 1/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago
Moki Cherry
Untitled, estimated 1996-1998
Acrylic on wood
36 5/8 × 12 1/2 × 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the estate of Moki Cherry
Moki Cherry (1943–2009) was a Swedish artist whose work embodied the radical experimentations of the ’70s through an interpenetrating array of painting, music, set design, theater, sculpture, ceramics, collage, and the vivid mandala-like tapestries for which she is best known. Her artwork graces the most striking album covers of her husband, the avant-garde jazz trumpeter Don Cherry, with whom she explored utopian impulses of counterurbanisation, subsistence farming, children’s pedagogy, and symbiotic concert happenings. The couple’s freewheeling performances’ blurring of lines between home and stage finds a physical manifestation in Moki’s refusal to frame her works, such as this wood painting. A contemporary and friend of Marie Louise Ekman and Niki de Saint Phalle, Moki shared those artists’ influences of surrealism and psychedelia, as well as the flat compositional impulse on display here. The collapsed space of the piece bears the persistent motifs of the spiral and circle, its brown, white, and green figures jumbled in an eternal dance. Having contended with a male art world’s dismissal of her textile works for their feminine and domestic associations, Moki’s depiction of spermatozoa reads equally as tongue-in-cheek farce and regenerative celebration. The piece’s patchwork quality additionally anticipates her turn, starting in 2003, to a more socially critical stance through photomontage.
Henning Christiansen
Peaceful Hammer HC, 1999
Paint on found object
13 2/5 × 8 1/4 × 5 7/8 in
Courtesy of Ursula Reuter Christiansen Askeby, Denmark
Henning Christiansen (1932-2008) was a Danish composer, musician, and artist best known as a pivotal member of the Nordic avant-garde. Enamored with, but not beholden to, the Fluxus movement he helped shape, Christiansen’s simple conception of music as sound organized in time continues to provide a model for moving beyond the degree zero polemics of the ‘60s avant-garde. His radical oeuvre consists of over 200 opuses that interpenetrate the categories of performance, ritual, happenings, sculpture, painting, tape music, text-sound composition, song, and instrumental music, all marked by the perennial acuity of his green-painted ear.

The hammer was an enduring image in Henning Christiansen’s practice. It was a sledgehammer that Ex-School coconspirator Poul Gernes banged into a piano already abused by Nam June Paik two years before, during a 1963 Fluxus action that resulted in Christiansen’s dismissal from the Royal Danish Academy of Music. The instrument—a symbol at once of destruction and of liberation—also appears in Christiansen’s visual output from the 1980s onward, including his HAMMERMUSIK and his green “peaceful hammers,” such as this one from 1999.
Ursula Reuter Christiansen
Diamanda Gallas, 2020
Collage
30 × 23 in
Courtesy of the artist
Ursula Reuter Christiansen (b. 1943) is a German artist with a penchant for using the dramatic narratives and imagery from Greek mythology and German fairy tales as a vehicle for her steadfastly feminist statements. In 1969—the same year she graduated from Düsseldorf’s Akademie der Künste, where she studied with Joseph Beuys—she began scripting her first film, Skarpretteren (The Executioner), which, like many of her films to follow, was soundtracked by her husband Henning Christiansen, with whom she lived in the Danish island of Møn beginning in 1970.

Her invocation of Diamanda Gallas (sic) in this recent collage casts the avant-garde goth high priestess as Medusa, with the constituent elements of the Gorgon legend—hair, stone, and serpents—split, in isolation beside a single arresting eye.
Ursula Reuter Christiansen
Rhinolophus hipposideros, 2020
Watercolor on paper
22 2/5 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist
Rising as if a phoenix from the ashes of its former self, this watercolor rendering of a lesser horseshoe bat from 2020 elaborates themes surrounding the Christiansens’ perennial ecological concerns. When the dust has settled from our own bat-borne inferno, will a glimmer of regeneration have accompanied this harbinger of doom?
Loren Connors
Wildweeds September #8, 2018
Acrylic and graphite on canvas
40 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist
Though he is best known as a guitarist who, over the past forty years, developed one of contemporary music’s most inimitable styles, Loren Connors (b. 1949) was a painter first, having studied visual art for five years at Southern Connecticut State College, in his hometown of New Haven, under the sculptor Michael Skop. Connors’ visual art and music reflect similar approaches, with both parts of his practice marked by open forms, light touches, and sweeping gestures—visual or aural indexes of the creative act.

His 2018 Wildweeds exhibition with Blank Forms featured a series of new paintings that continued an ongoing series of flower images, drawn or painted with an economical hand, a quality not unlike the impressionistic character of Connors’ guitar playing. The painted flowers of Wildweeds are in direct conversation with Connors’ music and its liminal location between the rustic, natural world and other spheres of being. Rendered with acrylic on canvas, these monochrome flowers possess skeletal forms and rootless bases that together promote fluid, subjective readings of their classification as alive or dead.
Loren Connors
Wildweeds September #9, 2018
Acrylic and graphite on canvas
40 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist
Raúl de Nieves
Serpent and the Sky VI, 2018
Paper on foam panel
60 × 40 × 4 in
Courtesy of the artist
Raúl de Nieves (b. 1983) is a New York-based multimedia artist and performer whose opulent, uplifting work encompasses large-scale figurative sculpture, narrative painting, convulsive performance, and music with noise rock band Hairbone. De Nieves is celebrated for his meticulous transformations of everyday and discarded objects—such as shoes, plastic beads, paper, and sequins—into spectacular, scintillating assemblages; ever-shifting layers of encrusted material that accrete new complexities over time. Inspired by childhood experiences watching local indigenous people such as the Huichols’ meticulous beadwork and yarn paintings, de Nieves draws his carnivalesque visual mythology from Mexican art, Catholicism, and Kabuki theater, as well as the queer nightlife of his ongoing punk youth. Like his faux stained glass (actually paper and tape) that dazzled viewers at the 2017 Whitney Biennial, Painted Bird 2 is constructed from humble means. The panel is from a series of six works, each made from vintage historical reproductions of master paintings printed by the Guggenheim in postcard form. The only piece remaining from the series, Painted Bird 2 has a kaleidoscopic 3-D effect that recalls topographical maps’ resemblance to abstract visions of movement.
Barbara Ess
Electrocute [Border Series], 2010
Archival pigment print
8 × 10 3/4 in
10 3/4 × 13 1/2 in framed
Courtesy of the artist and Magenta Plains
Rochelle Goldberg
Composite Mary, 2016
Glazed ceramic
9 × 4 × 6 in
Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York
Heather Guertin
The World Outside of Me, 2020
Oil on canvas
15 × 18 in
Courtesy of the artist, Brennan & Griffin, New York and Galleria Agustina Ferreyra
Camille Henrot
Tinkerbell, 2015
Watercolor on paper, mounted on dibond
44 5/8 × 30 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York
Sanya Kantarovsky
Shabolovka, 2020
Monotype print
22 1/4 × 14 3/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York
Veit Laurent Kurz
Plasticizers (Ghost Series), 2020
Plaster, wood, plastic, adhesive, acrylic on canvas
74 4/5 × 18 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist
Graham Lambkin
Sun Barricade, 2020
Pencil on distressed paper
33 × 23 in
Courtesy of the artist
Graham Lambkin (b. 1973) is a multidisciplinary artist who first came to prominence in the early ‘90s through the formation of his experimental music group The Shadow Ring. He has exhibited his visual work with Audio Visual Arts, 356 Mission, Künstlerhaus, PiK, and Blank Forms, Solos, a box set of his first four solo albums, is forthcoming from Blank Forms.

Beginning with distressed paper, abused by stones and nails and rubbed with oil, Lambkin’s destabilized planes spawn hallucinatory series of entangled biomorphic figures, liminal flora and fauna that appear uninvited in his endlessly reconfiguring landscapes. Emerging from a general malaise of despair, the whimsical mischief of Lambkin’s earlier creatures has recently shifted towards a more macabre meditation on ecological fragility, with the artist as a conduit for a real, rather than fantastic inner world. Embryonic forms proliferate upon flooded gyres, earthly delights in apparent acceptance of the wreckage and disintegration they have been thrust into.
Graham Lambkin
Leaf Construction #5, 2020
Pencil and collage elements on distressed paper
23 2/5 × 16 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Yusef Lateef
Flow Chart, N.D.
Watercolor, marker and pen on paper
15 × 14 in
19 × 17 in framed
Courtesy of Yusef Lateef Estate Collection
Yusef Lateef
Splish Splash, N.D.
Ink, watercolor, and graphite on paper
16 × 12 in
19 1/2 × 15 1/2 in framed
Courtesy of Yusef Lateef Estate Collection
Louise Lawler
She Wanted to Know More About This Statue, 1998
Black and white photograph with printed mat
3 7/8 × 5 1/4 in
13 1/2 × 11 in framed
Edition 8 of 10, 2 A.P.
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York
Miranda Lichtenstein
Untitled, 2020
Archival pigment print
19 × 13 in
Courtesy of the artist
Richard Maxwell
Claude’s Assignment, 2020
Oil on canvas
16 × 20 in
Courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York
Josiah McElheny
Observation Night Two, 2019
Acrylic on board with inset, hand-formed and polished micromosaic glass, black mirror, ash frame
21 7/8 × 21 7/8 × 2 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York
Josiah McElheny
Cosmic Elixir: Hamid Drake and Joe McPhee’s ‘Keep Going’, Distilled July 14, 2020, Bottle 07
Handblown glass bottle, cork, wax, distilled music elixir edition number embossed permanently into glass exterior 07 from numbered series of 99, unlimited number of “prescribed” letters A.P.s
Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago
Cosmic Elixir, an editioned artwork in which a handblown blue glass bottle is filled with music that has been distilled into liquid form, a magical and elusive potion known to free one from many afflictions and to set the particles of the brain into ultra-high-speed motion. An invention by the artist, this new distillation process infuses a single song into enough liquid to fill one bottle, which is then labeled on the bottom of the bottle with its date of distillation. Each purchase comes with one free refill of the same song, the purchaser pays for shipping both ways, but the artist will distill, refill and seal the bottle for free. Purchaser assumes all risks of owning this elixir and its potentially cosmic effects, even sealed inside the bottle.
John Miller
Untitled (09-14-17), 2017
Inkjet print
11 × 8 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Jeanette Mundt
I’d Like to Hold Her Head Under Water, 2020
Oil on canvas
24 × 20 in
Courtesy of the artist and Company Gallery, New York
Diane Severin Nguyen
Choral Offspring, 2019
Lambda print, steel artist’s frame
22 1/2 × 15 in
Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong
Nicolas Party
Trees for Blank Forms, 2020
Watercolor on paper
7 × 10 3/16 in
Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Zak Prekop
Graves & Tanaka, 2019
Oil on canvas
14 × 15 in
Courtesy of the artist and Essex Street Maxwell Graham
R.H. Quaytman
A Sketch of the Whole Complicated Subject of Universal History, 2014
Digital print with letterpress
13 3/8 × 19 1/2 in
A.P. from edition of 26 + 4 A.P.s
Courtesy of the artist
Raha Raissnia
Untitled, 2013
Oil and gesso on wood panel
24 × 32 in
Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York
Jessi Reaves
Renovate ur Background Mind, 2019
Graphite on paper
19 × 24 in
Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York
Andy Robert
Banjo, 2018
Pencil on paper
30 × 22 in
Courtesy of the artist, Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles, and Greene Naftali, New York
Matana Roberts
Always Say Your Name, 2015
Mixed media on board
8 × 14 in
Courtesy of the artist and The Fridman Gallery
Chicago-born, NYC-based alto saxophonist Matana Roberts (b. 1975) is an internationally renowned composer and bandleader whose work has forged new conceptual approaches to considering narrativity, history, community and political expression within improvisatory musical structures. A past member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), and the Black Rock Coalition (BRC), she draws from the intertwining narratives of her own genealogical research and fragments of African-American history to offer a nearly anthropological examination of music, storytelling, and the long, diverse trajectories of the African diaspora in America.

Her compositional approach, which she calls “P.S.Q.: Panoramic Sound Quilting”, employs collage-based paper and digital graphic scores as a basis for new music composition, improvisation and her bricolage of work songs, lullabies, spirituals, poetry, electronics, and primal screams. A mixed media score from 2015, always say your name honors what Roberts calls “the parallel histories of indigenous ppls, never truly told. Always nameless, but never blameless.”
Rachel Rose
Untitled, 2017
Pigment print
38 1/8 × 30 1/8 in
Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery
Alexandro Segade
Cathexis Mind Wipes Biopower, 2018
Ink on paper
11 × 17 in
Courtesy of the artist
Trevor Shimizu
Moss (detail) (2), 2019
Oil on canvas
14 × 16 in
Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York
Sun Ra
When Sun Comes Out, 1960
Unwrapped record cover, serigraph and offset print on yellow paper
12 3/4 × 22 1/2 in
Courtesy of John Corbett & Terri Kapsalis, Chicago, IL
Sun Ra (1914-1993) was a visionary jazz composer, bandleader, pianist, poet, and philosopher descended from Saturn whose mythology transposes the forced dislocation of the African diaspora from slave ship to spaceship, wielding technology and music as instruments for utopian black interplanetary migration. His aesthetics straddle the ancient and the radical future, positioned between Egypt and the space age, with his Arkestra’s sound situated between the classic big band, pioneering synthesis, and ecstatic free jazz.

The image for Sun Ra’s When Sun Comes Out was designed by Claude Dangerfield, an artist whose work graced a number of Chicago-era Sun Ra records. The album, subtitled Sun Ra Leaves Planet Earth, was a companion to Sun Ra Visits Planet Earth. This particular image, with its distinctive exploding globe/flower image, was printed with the intention of being tipped onto LP jackets, but was in fact seldom used, perhaps because of the intensity of the color combination and trouble with legibility of text. Precious few examples of the finished product exist, but this extremely rare example is a complete, unwrapped print, silk-screened and offset printed on yellow paper. An early example of the more apocalyptic side of Sun Ra’s highly coded record cover imagery.
Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Akio Suzuki (b. 1941) is a Japanese artist whose work has foregrounded the act of listening since a 1963 performance contemplating the sounds of a bucket of junk thrown down a flight of train station stairs. Often considered a sound shaman or “quester after sound and space”, Suzuki’s minimal interventions penetrate equally into natural and industrial contexts, opening perceptive spaces and unveiling acoustic subtleties lying dormant everywhere. Renderings of cats taken from and inspired by Suzuki’s 2008 Aki-nyan, tora no maki, a comic zine depicting cats playing his many instrumental eventions, have adorned Blank Forms’ tote bags and t-shirts since 2017.

These Collotype prints are based on Monotype drawings Suzuki originally made between 1976 and 1983. In 2016, he reproduced them as the shi mi no fu series of 10 works total in an edition of 10 each.
Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist
Stefan Tcherepnin
Golfing Accident, 2020
Water-soluble pencil on paper
14 × 17 in
Courtesy of the artist
Stefan Tcherepnin (b. 1977) is an American contemporary artist, electronic musician, songwriter, and composer in fourth generation, continuing the family heritage of his great-grandfather Nicholas, grandfather Alexander, and father Ivan Tcherepnin. An intimate of Blank Forms, we’ve published his recordings, with Marianne Schroeder, of Maryanne Amacher’s Petra and with his group Afuma. His most recent immersive meta-narrative installation, the 2019 Kunsthalle Zürich show HonkY Tonk CalamitY >< Ms. Fortune on the Links, added the themes of golf and honky-tonk to Tcherepnin’s signature stuffed Cookie Monsters, replete with an opening performance involving the near-slapstick use of golf clubs as mallets upon a suspended structure of resonant metal. In his latest work, Golfing Accident, the monsters are no longer rendered explicitly, but their insatiable appetite lingers as a specter hanging over a sardonic wasteland of the environment for networking and dealmaking preferred by the powers that be.


Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili
Quarantine Flowers, 2020
Polaroid
4.25 × 3.5 in
Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris and LC Queisser, Tbilisi


Inquire


Kai Althoff
Untitled, 2018
Oil in linen
26 × 23 in
36 1/4 × 32 3/4 in framed
Courtesy of the artist and TRAMPS


Inquire


Leilah Babirye
The Kuchu Series (Queer Ugandans), 2019
Acrylic on paper
12 × 9 in
Courtesy of Gordon Robichaux, New York and Stephen Friedman, London


Inquire


Fia Backström
Touching Sensibles I, 2015
Photogravure with woodcut
22 × 29 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Trisha Baga
General Fatigue, 2018
Acrylic on lenticular print
27 1/8 × 19 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali Gallery, New York


Inquire


Olga Balema
Biomorphic Attachment (looking at a tree), 2014
Foam, latex, steel
76 3/4 × 23 5/8 × 15 3/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and High Art Gallery, Paris


Inquire


Davide Balula
Clock (Swamped Up Sagg), 2020
Wood, weed, modified clock
23 in diameter, 14 in deep
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris


Inquire


Peter Brötzmann
Untitlted (landscape), 2012
Painted wooden box construction with shaped metal, painted foam, and copper wire
6 1/4 × 8 × 3 1/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago


Inquire


Moki Cherry
Untitled, estimated 1996-1998
Acrylic on wood
36 5/8 × 12 1/2 × 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the estate of Moki Cherry


Inquire


Henning Christiansen
Peaceful Hammer HC, 1999
Paint on found object
13 2/5 × 8 1/4 × 5 7/ 8 in
Courtesy of Ursula Reuter Christiansen Askeby, Denmark


Inquire


Ursula Reuter Christiansen
Diamanda Gallas, 2020
Collage
20 × 23 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Ursula Reuter Christiansen
Rhinolophus hipposideros, 2020
Watercolor on paper
22 2/5 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Loren Connors
Wildweeds September #8, 2018
Acrylic and graphite on canvas
40 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Loren Connors
Wildweeds September #9, 2018
Acrylic and graphite on canvas
40 × 30 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Raúl de Nieves
Serpent and the Sky VI, 2018
Paper on foam panel
60 × 40 × 4 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Barbara Ess
Electrocute [Border Series], 2010
Archival pigment print
8 × 10 3/4 in
10 3/4 × 13 1/2 in framed
Courtesy of the artist and Magenta Plains


Inquire


Rochelle Goldberg
Composite Mary, 2016
Glazed ceramic
9 × 4 × 6 in
Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


Inquire


Heather Guertin
The World Outside of Me, 2020
Oil on canvas
15 × 18 in
Courtesy of the artist, Brennan & Griffin, New York and Galleria Agustina Ferreyra


Inquire


Camille Henrot
Tinkerbell, 2015
Watercolor on paper, mounted on dibond
44 5/8 × 30 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York


Inquire


Sanya Kantarovsky
Shabolovka, 2020
Monotype print
22 1/4 × 14 3/4 in
Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York


Inquire


Veit Laurent Kurz
Plasticizers (Ghost Series), 2020
Plaster, wood, plastic, acrylic on canvas
74 4/5 × 18 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Graham Lambkin
Sun Barricade, 2020
Pencil on distressed paper
33 × 23 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Graham Lambkin
Leaf Construction #5, 2020
Pencil and collage elements on distressed paper
23 2/5 × 16 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Yusef Lateef
Flow Chart, N.D.
Watercolor, marker and pen on paper
15 × 14 in
19 × 17 in framed
Courtesy of Yusef Lateef Estate Collection


Inquire


Yusef Lateef
Splish Splash, N.D.
Ink, watercolor, and graphite on paper
16 × 12 in
19 1/2 × 15 1/2 in framed
Courtesy of Yusef Lateef Estate Collection


Inquire


Louise Lawler
She Wanted to Know More About This Statue, 1998
Black and white photograph with printed mat
3 7/8 × 5 1/4 in
13 1/2 × 11 in framed
Edition 8 of 10, 2 A.P.
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York


Inquire


Miranda Lichtenstein
Untitled, 2020
Archival pigment print
19 × 13 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Richard Maxwell
Claude’s Assignment, 2020
Oil on canvas
16 × 20 in
Courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York


Inquire


Josiah McElheny
Observation Night Two, 2019
Acrylic on board with inset, hand-formed and polished micromosaic glass, black mirror, ash frame
21 7/8 × 21 7/8 × 2 1/8 in
Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York


Inquire


Josiah McElheny
Cosmic Elixir: Hamid Drake and Joe McPhee’s ‘Keep Going’, Distilled July 14, 2020, Bottle 07
Handblown glass bottle, cork, wax, distilled music elixir edition number embossed permanently into glass exterior 07 from numbered series of 99, unlimited number of “prescribed” letters A.P.s
Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago


Inquire


John Miller
Untitled (09-14-17), 2017
Inkjet print
11 × 8 1/2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Jeanette Mundt
I’d Like to Hold Her Head Under Water, 2020
Oil on canvas
24 × 20 in
Courtesy of the artist and Company Gallery, New York


Inquire


Diane Severin Nguyen
Choral Offspring, 2019
Lambda print, steel artist’s frame
22 1/2 × 15 in
Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong


Inquire


Nicolas Party
Trees for Blank Forms, 2020
Watercolor on paper
7 × 10 3/16 in
Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth


Inquire


Zak Prekop
Graves & Tanaka, 2019
Oil on canvas
14 × 15 in
Courtesy of the artist and Essex Street Maxwell Graham


Inquire


R.H. Quaytman
A Sketch of the Whole Complicated Subject of Universal History, 2014
Digital print with letterpress
13 3/8 × 19 1/2 in
A.P. from edition of 26 + 4 A.P.s
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Raha Raissnia
Untitled, 2013
Oil and gesso on wood panel
24 × 32 in
Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


Inquire


Jessi Reaves
Renovate ur Background Mind, 2019
Graphite on paper
19 × 24 in
Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York


Inquire


Andy Robert
Banjo, 2018
Pencil on paper
30 × 22 in
Courtesy of the artist, Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles, and Greene Naftali, New York


Inquire


Matana Roberts
Always Say Your Name, 2015
Mixed media on board
8 × 14 in
Courtesy of the artist and The Fridman Gallery


Inquire


Rachel Rose
Untitled, 2017
Pigment print
38 1/8 × 30 1/8 in
Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery


Inquire


Alexandro Segade
Cathexis Mind Wipes Biopower, 2018
Ink on paper
11 × 17 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Trevor Shimizu
Moss (detail) (2), 2019
Oil on canvas
14 × 16 in
Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York


Inquire


Sun Ra
When Sun Comes Out, 1960
Unwrapped record cover, serigraph and offset print on yellow paper
12 3/4 × 22 1/2 in
Courtesy of John Corbett and Terri Kapsalis, Chicago, IL


Inquire


Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Akio Suzuki
shi mi no fu, 2016
Edition 6/10
Collotype
3 × 2 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire


Stefan Tcherepnin
Golfing Accident, 2020
Water-soluble pencil on paper
14 × 17 in
Courtesy of the artist


Inquire

For all inquiries please contact Julia Trotta:
julia@blankforms.org / ( 917-499-9005 )
INQUIRY